The Himalayan Balsam Scourge Begins Again (3 images)

Himalayan Balsam is poking its leaves above ground now; the marsh cattle will soon be feasting on this very prolific and invasive plant.

In the UK, the Himalayan Balsam plant was first introduced in 1839 at the same time as Giant Hogweed and Japanese Knotweed. These plants were all promoted at the time as having the virtues of “herculean proportions” and “splendid invasiveness” which meant that ordinary people could buy them for the cost of a packet of seeds to rival the expensive orchids grown in the greenhouses of the rich. Within ten years, however, Himalayan balsam had escaped from the confines of cultivation and begun to spread along the river systems of England. Today it has spread across most of the UK and some local wildlife trusts organise “balsam bashing” events to help control the plant. However, a recent study (Hejda & Pyšek, 2006) concludes that in some circumstances, such efforts may cause more harm than good. Destroying riparian stands of Himalayan Balsam can open up the habitat for more aggressive invasive plants such as Japanese knotweed and aid in seed dispersal (by dropped seeds sticking to shoes). Riparian habitat is suboptimal for I. glandulifera, and spring or autumn flooding destroys seeds and plants. The research suggests that the optimal way to control the spread of riparian Himalayan Balsam is to decrease eutrophication, thereby permitting the better-adapted local vegetation that gets outgrown by the balsam on watercourses with high nutrient load to rebound naturally. They caution that these conclusions probably do not hold true for stands of the plant at forest edges and meadow habitats, where manual destruction is still the best approach. (Source Wikipedia)

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Himalayan Balsam

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Himalayan Balsam

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Himalayan Balsam

Image | This entry was posted in Wilden Marsh Nature Reserve and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

7 Responses to The Himalayan Balsam Scourge Begins Again (3 images)

  1. Large parts of the U.S., especially in cattle country, have invasive weed species too. Cattle do not like certain species, but sheep and llama do.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Sounds like an insurmountable problem, good luck!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Wow, “Splendid Invasiveness” – marketing spin at its best.

    Like

  4. tootlepedal says:

    Bon appetit to the cattle on Wilden Marsh.

    Liked by 1 person

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