A Tranquil Place.

Sunrise: 05.33 Sunset: 08.40

This is a tranquil place to sit and wile away a few spare hours, particularly when it’s hot, sunny, and steamy. It can be pleasant on a dark evening, too. I sit quietly, dreaming of long-lost days spent slaying fire dragons and saving maidens from one calamity or another – even certain death. My dreams can be very intense and vivid down at the pond, relaxing on my lounger.

Sometimes I ponder the future and wonder if there is another crock of gold buried somewhere on the marsh, and where it might be. I have the right kind of spade for unearthing crocks; I just need a break.

I’ve learned how to protect myself against the hordes of biting insects – they no longer make my life on the marsh a misery. Nature slides slowly by, and I am invisible to the marsh inhabitants going about their every-day lives.

Ducks glide in during the evening. The marsh fox lies in wait, hoping to grab the unwary. A muntjac deer trips nimbly through the thick vegetation, alert to every sound and movement. A kingfisher streaks low over the water, and the resident coot shouts a warning that the fox is near by.

It’s all too easy to slip into a deep sleep, only to be rudely woken by an inquisitive squirrel or some other small creature trying to climb inside my trouser leg.

Sometimes I hear strange noises. On a few occasions, I’ve heard the sound of bagpipes floating in on a breeze. I’ve no idea who is playing the bagpipes; Kidderminster is a long way from Scotland – they play in the afternoon and evening. It’s not the onset of senility, either; other people have also heard the wailing pipes.

The canal is not far away. I hear the metallic ringing sound of the Falling Sands lock gate sluice ratchet being operated.

Whoa, there’s something crawling up my leg . . . !

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A Tranquil Place.

11 Comments on “A Tranquil Place.

  1. I use string now, Tom. Thanks for the suggestion, it is much appreciated.

    String is an well tried method of keeping rats and the like from using the trouser leg as a bolt pipe. Agricultural and sewage workers, and miners have tied their trouser legs around their shins with string ever since the potential seriousness of the problem was originally recognised.

      • Thanks Mike. We are planning to be at Ynys Hir at the beginning of June. I don’t know if it will be a problem then but we have suffered quite badly in the past from mosquito bites.

      • Boots tropical strength repellent works for me. I spray it on my neck I and ears only, and use fingerless gloves to protect my hands against insect bites. It works marvellously for me.

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